Fashion history I.: Medieval noble dresses

As I was walking around in the Castle of Siklós, I couldn’t help but notice the amazing dresses that were displayed on wax statues everywhere. Those big skirts made me think how lazily we are dressing ourselves these days compared to that.

What did I learn from the exhibition?
Velvet, baize, linen, silk, lace and brocade were the most common materials for noble clothes.
There was no difference in the colour palette of men’s and women’s clothing. Green, yellow and red were the most populatar colours.
All of women’s dresses had a massive puckered skirt and the sleeves of the upper gament were getting wider from the elbow to the wrist.
The decorating elements on women’s clothing in general were lace, embroidery and pearls.
Decorated headpieces made the outfit complete. Only maidens could walk in the town with uncovered hair.
Jewelry were made of gold, silver and gemstones.
Men wore tight trousers with shirt and a coat on top of that.
The coat’s margin was covered with some kind of fur (such as marten, sable or ermine).
The accesories of men were the decorated buttons on their jacket.

Spring beauties

After a very long and cold winter, spring has finally arrived. Brace yourselves! The trees might feel confused because it’s warm all of a sudden, but they certainly try their best to catch up.

I had plans you know… Each year I’m visiting the magnolia trees with my best friend. We take pictures and just admire its beauty. Never missed one since I’m in Szeged. This year was different though. They began to blossom very quickly. I wanted to shoot some portraits, I even found a model. Last Monday after work we were heading to the trees on Széchenyi Square. And then there was nothing… There weren’t even petals under the tree.

It made me very sad that I missed it this year, but instead I was shooting pictures of other natural beauties. There are thousands of colourful tulips as well in Széchenyi Square, they are certainly worthy of attention. Then I went to my hometown, Kecskemét for the weekend and took some shots there as well in Deák Ferenc Square and my parents’ garden.

Wishing all of you a beautiful spring! I hope you find beauty around you.

 

Photography books II.: Mihaela Noroc

Mihaela Noroc: The Atlas of Beauty

This 32-year old photographer from Bucharest has been travelling all around the world in the last couple of years to take pictures of beautiful women. Singapore, France, Brazil, Iran, Tibet, Ecuador, Myanmar and Mexico are just few of the places she has already visited. According to Mihaela’s Instagram, she is currently in India to ‘explore the unnoticed beauty which lies in people around us’.
She also tells stories about the women she photographs. What it is like to be working as living statues in Ukraine? What it is like to live with a birthmark on your cheek? What are the days like in a refugee camp? These stories reflect not only the situation of women, but also the world we currently live in. What we only consider today an anecdote will become history tomorrow.

Follow Mihaela on her journey:
The Atlas of Beauty (Official)
The Atlas of Beauty (Instagram)
The Atlas of Beauty (Facebook)

Elle Hungary shared my picture!

I’m starting Monday with advertising. Not exactly what you are used to from me, right? But I have to.
It all started on Friday, when I was waiting for my train and just finished the book I was reading, so I decided to buy something at the newsagent’s. My favourite magazines has been Elle and Marie Claire for a long time, but this month’s gift made me choose easily. April’s Elle issue comes with a classic novel! How cool is that?! Readers can select from Antal Szerb’s Journey by Moonlight, Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights and The Scarlet Letter from Nathaniel Hawthorne. I was not in the mood for Heathcliff’s sufferings, and I already saw the Hungarian novel’s adaptation in the theatre. So I went with Hawthorne.

Why does it make me happy?
I’m always glad to meet initiations that make people read more, because I think reading is becoming less and less popular with each year passing by. So I’m supporting everything to make reading cool again.

Wishing all of you a great day full of stories! 🙂

This is the one I posted on Instagram today:

And their respost:

‘All the Rage’ fashion exhibition in Wroclaw

In July 2016 I visited the National Museum in Wroclaw where in that time was an extraordinary exhibition of clothes and accessories that has been worn by the elite in the Communist era /1945-1989/. While ordinary costumers couldn’t afford silk dresses or any kind of designer clothing, privileged people of that time followed the fashion trends of Paris. There has been Polish designers and brands who released their collections frequently such as Moda Polska, Cora, Telimena and Dany, their products were unavailable to the public and made only for export. The exhibition was organised by Małgorzata Możdżyńska-Nawotka and Joanna Regina Kowalska and it debuted in Kraków first. According to Ms. Nawotka, ‘It makes an attempt to examine fashion as an area of artistic creation and designers’ creativity’. The exhibited items included dresses, overcoats, jackets, jumpsuits, evening gowns, wedding dresses, hats, clutches and shoes. It was open to public from May to August 2016.

Annie Leibovitz teaches photography!

‘There’s this idea that in portaiture it’s the photographer’s job to set the subject at ease. I don’t believe that. Robert Penn Warren was writing about dying and death and I just asked him to take his shirt off, but it was more like I wanted to see his skeleton. He didn’t have any guard or shield. What are my favourite photographs? Agnes Martin sitting in her painting studio. She said to me, ‘I sit here and I wait to be inspired’. I’d loved that. And so I said, ‘I just want you to sit there’. Isn’t that what we all do? We wait to be inspired. All the work that I’ve ever done, the ideas emanate from that person. Stand over here. Present yourself. We are so complicated as human beings, there are so many parts to us, that’s where the ideas come from. Even in the most set up situation I believe there is something really going on. ‘I’m so not a technical photographer.’ If that’s what you’re thinking about, you are not taking pictures. When you first start off, stay with one lens and see what it does. Photograph the people close to you. Your family, your friends. That’s how I learned. When you photograph people, it’s about history, it’s about looking in our time, our culture and our society – through portraits. Don’t be afraid to be obsessed. Take the camera, go out in the world, and find a way to tell a story that means something to you.’ /Annie Leibovitz/

Click here to find out more!

Budapest sights III.

I’ve been to Budapest again… 3 times in 3 months is more than I visit this city in a year!
This time I visited the Buda Castle region. It is located on Castle Hill and served as the residence of Hungarian kings from the 13th century. It is part of World Heritage Site.
In Castle District you can also find Matthias Church and Fisherman’s Bastion, they are next to each other.

Matthias Church
2. Szentháromság Square
Opening hours: Monday-Friday 9:00-17:00, Saturday 9:00-12:00, Sunday 13:00-17:00
Tickets: 1000-1500 HUF
Click here for more information!
Matthias Church (also called as Church of Our Lady of Buda) was built in the 11th century. It had to survive a lot off attacks (for example the Mongols destroyed it completely) and it had to be rebuilt many times until it became its final, Gothic styled form. It was named after King Matthias, the Just.

Fisherman’s Bastion
Szentháromság Square
Opening hours: Open every day! Monday-Sunday 9:00-23:00
Tickets: 500-1000 HUF
Click here for more information!
In front of Matthias Church, you can find Fisherman’s Bastion, which is basically a terrace that was built in neo-Gothic style in the 19th century. It gives a wonderful view to River Danube and the Hungarian Parliament. It atracts tourists even in the coldest weather. There is also the statue of St. Stephen, the first Hungarian king and you can take pictures with a falcon if you are brave enough.

Buda Castle
2. Szent György Square
Opening hours: Closed on Mondays! From the beginning of November to the end of February Tuesday-Friday  10:00-16:00, Saturday-Sunday 10:00-18:00, From the beginning of March to the end of October Tuesday-Sunday 10:00-18:00
Tickets: 1000-2000 HUF
Click here for more information!
The construction of the Castle started already in the 13rd century. The building itself has gone through a lot, the attack of Turks and Tatars, World Was II, its final reconstruction started in 1946. The Castle’s current exhibitions include history of the Castle, ancient cultures and gothic statues.